Woe to Me to Live Among Such People
 
From: bernhard1848@att.net
 
Those in New England who brought on war assumed that the American South, like the rest of the country, was their property, and had no right to depart.  Risking few of their own lives, they put at risk the lives of many others – essentially raising a bounty-enriched army of foreign and domestic mercenaries, impressed black slaves and well-paid substitutes to fight their war.
 
Bernhard Thuersam, Chairman
North Carolina War Between the States Sesquicentennial Commission
www.ncwbts150.com
"The Official Website of the North Carolina WBTS Sesquicentennial"
 
Woe to Me to Live Among Such People:
 
“A Northern woman who was a native of Rhode Island, but who had lived all her married life in the South, returned after her widowhood to Providence to be among her people. The following letter was written by her to my mother [Mrs. Louis T. Wigfall]:
 
May 13, 1861.
 
“….We are always delighted to hear from you – and indeed your letters and Louis’s are the only comfort we have in this Yankee land surrounded by people who have no sympathy with us, and who only open their mouths to revile the South and utter blood-thirsty threats. This morning an amiable lady wished she had Jeff Davis in front of a big cannon. We now have sufficient proof of how much stronger hate is than love of country.
 
Where was the patriotism of Massachusetts when the country was at war with the English in 1812?  I lived then at the South, and was ashamed of my countrymen who refused to assist in the war. Massachusetts, which was the leading State of New England, refused to let her militia leave the State and when the US troops were withdrawn, to fight in other places, applied to the Federal Government to know whether the expenses of their own militia, who were summoned to defend their own State, would be reimbursed by the Government.
 
When our capitol at Washington was burned with the President’s House and Treasury buildings, and other public buildings, why did they not go to meet the British?  On the contrary, they rejoiced at the English victories, and put every obstacle in the way of the government.
 
Now they are subscribing millions, and urging every man to go and fight their own countrymen. It is not patriotism; it is hatred to the South and woe is me, that I must live here among such people.  God grant you success, It is a righteous war and all the bloodshed will be on the souls of those who brought it on.
 
I think, however, that you at the South are wrong to undervalue the courage and resources of the Northern States. They are less disposed to fight, but they are not cowardly where their interests are concerned; and will fight for their money. Where their property is at stake they will not hesitate to risk their lives, and at present there is no lack of money.
 
(A Southern Girl in ’61, The War-Time Memories of a Confederate Senator’s Daughter, Mrs. D. Giraud Wright, Doubleday, Page & Company, 1905, pp. 51-53)