An example of how different even family members today view the war 61-65
 
From: tandpam@shawneelink.net
 
Chuck Sir, and all others here,
 
As this Sunday evenin’ winds down, I thought I would relate something that I witnessed first hand this weekend at my mother n law’s.
 
We had not celebrated Christmas with her yet, as she had been in the hospital just prior to and during the Christmas holiday; and Pam had been down with pneumonia.
 
We left out Friday early and made the hour and half drive southwest to exchange gifts and visit. I would say we hadn’t been there for more than twenty minutes or so, when Pam’s favorite uncle and his wife knocked at the door.
 
Now, I gotta tell ya, I love ’em both, but "Uncle Edsel" has to be one of my all time favorite people ever.  He is a 6′ 2" tall rail of a man, in his mid 80’s whose accent and Southern drawl is as thick as any I have heard in Ky. Tn. or Ms. for that matter.
 
Now, "Uncle" has had little formal education as he went to work as a boy as the breadwinner of the family of four after his daddy died.  He is very well read on many subjects (history especially), and all in all if it can be built with human hands he can do it.
 
I can listen to him talk for hours, he is an old school story teller and has one of the best senses of humour God ever gave a human bein’.  For reference he is on the complete opposite end of the spectrum with his sister (Pam’s mom).  I never met their WW II war hero brother as he died tragically in a fire in the early 50’s, but I have been told by various people who knew him that he and Edsel were quite similar in regards to reading and their love of history.  I know he took some incredible photos of the war in the Island campaigns and the aftermath of the bombs, as Mayme has his personal photo journal, a gift of kindness courtesy of Uncle Edsel.
 
Ok, so there is the background of the main players in this account. Now on to the reason for this post.
 
We had all been talkin’ about this and that, just small talk like people do when they haven’t seen each other in awhile.  Pam’s mom pipes up and asks us "Did you see the statue of lincoln on the lawn of the Appellate Courthouse?"  She immediately followed that up with “I went and took pictures of it the other day; it is the best thing this city has ever done."

Well, I thought I was gonna hurl, Pam turned about as white in colour as one can, and Mayme  (who loves her grammy as much as any  child can) almost choked on the vitamin water she was drinkin’.
 
Now, before I could even interject my "two beads worth”,"Uncle" slaps the arms of the recliner he was sittin’ in and says" Sis, you are taking up with the wrong side, our kin fought for the Confederacy."
 
Pam’s mom replies with something to the effect, "that doesn’t mean it was the right side."….and the history lesson from her brother was on.
 
My little family just sat there mouths shut…..oh we could have said plenty but, there was no need…."Uncle" had all the facts regardin’ "Mr. lincoln"….and he sure didn’t have any problem sharin’ them either.  My mother n law might have fired the first volley, but "Uncle” returned it with double canister of grape, and upon completion he rose from his chair, hugged Pam, Mayme, took my hand with the strength of a 30 year old, and said "Still got those flags flying at your house?" To which I replied "yes sir and they will as long as I live there."  Still shakin’ my hand, he put his other arm around my shoulder and said "you’re a good man".
 
Well, there ya have it, a fresh account of how siblings today can view the most horrible chapter in American history from totally different perspectives; just as they did oh so long ago.
 
That war is never gonna be over, and like it began…it’s still not our fault.
 
T warren
Heritage Officer Camp 2022 Ga Div SCV