Antebellum Bondage North and South
 
From: bernhard1848@att.net
 
Thomas Jefferson was well aware that the perilous “wolf by the ears” predicament facing the United States in his time was greatly the fault of New England’s avarice and penchant for slave trading profits. He watched the North sell its slaves southward and then proclaim itself “free States,” all while exploiting women and children for 14-hours a day in oppressive factories, and paid slave wages.
 
Bernhard Thuersam, Director
Cape Fear Historical Institute
www.cfhi.net
 
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The Slave Trade of the Pious Yankee:
 
“Mr. Jefferson’s opposition to slavery was known then, as it is now. Undoubtedly appreciating the fact that slavery, as prevalent then in the South, was extremely expensive to the masters, far more than “slavery” subsequently maintained by the Northern manufacturer, he stated his grievance upon this matter in the original draft of the Declaration [of Independence], but subsequently crossed out this paragraph.
 
In a courteous, yet Voltaire-like manner, he caustically refers to the slave-trade of the pious Yankee, and, rather than cause a disruption, he omitted that clause from his draft. Thus, while there was chance of earning a few dollars, the North was fully willing to accept the conditions and to continue the [slave] trade. Indeed, when certain Southern States prohibited the importation of slaves, it was New England which arose in defense of that trade.
 
“Times change and we with them.” After selling their slaves into the South, the same people suddenly changed their minds as to slavery, and, lifting up their hands in horror, described the Southern slave owner as an inhuman brute, a cruel oppressor, etc. The abolition societies and various fanatics, sincere and insincere, voluntary fanatics and paid fanatics, suddenly discovered supposedly crying needs of the “poor, downtrodden black brother,” and by various means and devices, attempted his emancipation. No crime and injustice was omitted in their acts.
 
And yet, simultaneously, hundreds of thousands of men, women and children, white too, were held in a more inhuman bondage in the North than the black man down South.  Living under the most deplorable and miserable conditions, working long hours with hardly enough food to keep body and soul together, that mob of inhumanity was called free!
 
Truly they were free, free to die!”
 
(Secession, W.A. Lederer, Philadelphia, Confederate Veteran Magazine, September 1930, page 338)