From: "Russ Huffman" <Muley29178@alltel.net>
Date: April 3, 2009

I am waiting for someone, anyone to come up with a single living human who didn’t have ancestors that were slaves to someone else at some point in history.  We should never try to argue with anyone who plays the slavery card.  Just because so-called African-Americans were the most recent slaves that resided in this country certainly does not make them an exclusive group.  Slavery was simply an agricultural system that was as acceptable (read normal) in pre-1865 America as gay rights have become to the Federal government today.  What would nineteenth century citizens have thought about gays and lesbians openly celebrating their "lifestyle"?  We continue to judge things only by what we deem is acceptable today.
    
I am not one bit ashamed that slavery is part of Southern (and Northern) heritage.  What might be reprehensible or incomprehensible to us today was the status quo back then.  How can we be so arrogant as to condemn society of 150 years ago for something that we condemn today?  Things change, ideas evolve and life goes on.  I would guess that the average person in 1860 would have recoiled in horror at how our society behaves today, and what about 150 years in the future?  How will our descendents look back on us?
    
We should quit being defensive and quit saying slavery had nothing to do with the War of Northern Aggression.  Certainly it played a role, and we shouldn’t try to deny it. Instead we should just point out to our critics, the ignorant and uniformed that the entire USA supported slavery back then.  Over 600,000 men and women didn’t die trying to resolve the slavery issue, and trying to argue with those who insist they did will never get us anywhere.
    
I think we should say "yes, most of the country favored slavery back then, so what is your point?"
    
Russ Huffman 

From: Georgia Flagger
Sent: Thursday, April 02, 2009 10:31 PM
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