Saving the South For Southerners
 
From: Bernhard1848@att.net

After the Jeffersonian Democratic party of 1940 began the conservative movement against FDR’s "communization" of the Democratic party, editor William Watts Ball of the Charleston News and Courier welcomed the renewed interest in a Southern party in 1944. Though stigmatized as a segregationist party by the socialists and communists of Truman’s Democratic party; Henry Wallace’s pro-Soviet Progressive party and the NAACP, the States Rights Democratic Party platform of 1948 was dominated by strict construction of the Constitution as the Founders intended. In addition to opposition to federal nullification of State powers and rights, the Southern Democrats opposed the usurpation of legislative functions by the executive and judicial departments and condemned "the effort to establish in the United States a police nation that would destroy the last vestige of liberty enjoyed by a citizen."

The so-called "Dixiecrat" party was a serious attempt to return to the Founder’s vision of conservative and free government, followed by Robert Taft’s short candidacy four years later in the Republican party (though marginalized by the leftist Republicans of Eisenhower), and then Barry Goldwater’s 1964 ill-fated run for the presidency. 
 
Bernhard Thuersam, Executive Director
Cape Fear Historical Institute
Post Office Box 328
Wilmington, NC 28402
www.CFHI.net

Saving the South For Southerners:
 
"A full year before the end of Roosevelt’s third term, Ball was again active in attempts to organize a Southern Democratic party. It was the spring of 1944, however, before the movement was underway in earnest. Through public contributions (Ball gave one hundred dollars) the anti-Roosevelt faction hoped to finance an advertising campaign in newspapers and on radio. The independent white Democrats would not present candidates in the primaries, but offer only a ticket of presidential electors pledged not to vote for Roosevelt. They might back a favorite son for president, or they might better co-operate with the similarly-minded in other States in support of someone like Senator Harry Byrd of Virginia…..in May anti-Roosevelt Democrats had held their first meeting in Columbia, with nineteen counties represented, and made plans for a State convention. The Southern Democratic party had been reborn.
 
(Ball’s) News and Courier continued to urge the election of independent Democratic electors. If eleven to sixteen Southern States withheld their electoral votes, they could assure respect for their political policies. But in spite of the untiring efforts of The News and Courier, aided principally by the Greenwood Index-Journal, the anti-Roosevelt movement did not develop. Very few people made financial contributions; the Southern Democratic party could not wage an effective campaign. Once again South Carolina gave solid support to Roosevelt and the Democratic party.  All the State schools except the Citadel, he charged, were part of the State political machine…."
 
But at that moment, the "second Reconstruction" was already underway…(and) emerging forces combined to force open the entire (racial) issue. The Negro migration northward had begun in earnest with World War I. By 1940, a small Negro professional and white-collar class resided in a number of northern cities and it used its growing political power to win greater equality of treatment there. Because New Deal programs were designed to advance employment and (employment) security, including that of Negroes, most northern Negroes abandoned their historic allegiance to the Republican party. In cities like New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Cleveland, the Democratic political machine depended heavily upon the Negro vote.
 
But already an earnest and vital independent political movement was underway (in 1948), in protest against the civil rights program (that courted the black vote) of the Truman administration and the attitudes of the liberal court. Of 531 electoral votes, 140 were in the South; yet the North, East and West treated the South as a slave province. Other papers joined Ball in the demand for action; the (Columbia) State, like the News and Courier, called for a Southern third party. On January 19th, in the State Democratic party’s biennial convention, Governor Strom Thurmond was nominated for the office of president of the United States. The State’s national convention votes were to be withheld from Harry S. Truman. If Truman were nominated, South Carolina would not support the national party in the electoral college. The State had not spoken so sharply since 1860; it would bolt rather than accept Truman. At the same time Governor Fielding L. Wright of Mississippi issued the call to revolt at the western end of the Deep South.
 
The Southern governors’ conference…named its own political action committee, headed by Thurmond, which was to go to Washington…to demand concessions…from President Truman. About two weeks later a delegation of governors met with Howard McGrath, National Chairman of the Democratic party. When McGrath gave a flat "No" to their request that Truman’s anti-discrimination proposals be withdrawn, the governors of South Carolina, North Carolina, Texas, and Arkansas called on Democrats to join a revolt against Truman. The South, they announced, was not "in the bag" anymore.
 
If the South united behind Thurmond, Truman would lose all its electoral votes and the election might be thrown to the House of Representatives, where with the votes of the South and the West, a man such as Thurmond would have a real chance. Whatever the outcome, the national parties would learn a lesson they would not soon forget—the "Solid South" would no longer be a dependable political factor. "In the electoral college," Ball advised, "lies the only chance to save the South for Southerners."
 
(Damned Upcountryman, William Watts Ball, John D. Starke, Duke Press, 1968, excerpts, pp. 201-233