Electronic Edition

Eggleston, George Cary, 1839-1911


Funding from the Library of Congress/Ameritech National Digital Library Competition
supported the electronic publication of this title.


Text scanned (OCR) by Christopher Gwyn
Text encoded by Don Sechler and Natalia Smith
First edition, 1997.
ca. 550K
Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
1998.
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

Call number E487 .E32 1875 (Davis Library, UNC-CH)


The electronic edition is a part of the UNC-CH digitization project, Documenting the American South, or, The Southern Experience in 19th-century America.

Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
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Library of Congress Subject Headings,

21st edition, 1998

    LC Subject Headings:

  • Eggleston, George Cary, 1839-1911.
  • Virginia — History — Civil War, 1861-1865 — Personal narratives.
  • Virginia — Social life and customs.
  • Southern States — Social life and customs.
  • Confederate States of America. Army — Military life.
  • Confederate States of America — History.
  • United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865 — Personal narratives, Confederate.
  • United States — History — Civil War, 1861-1865 — Women.

    • 1998-01-09,
      Natalia Smith,
      finished TEI-conformant encoding and final proofing.

    • 1997-12-30,
      Don Sechler
      finished TEI/SGML encoding

    • 1997-09-10,
      Christopher Gwyn
      finished scanning (OCR) and proofing.


A
REBEL’S RECOLLECTIONS

BY

GEORGE CARY EGGLESTON

AUTHOR OF "A MAN OF HONOR"

NEW YORK
PUBLISHED BY HURD AND HOUGHTON
Cambridge: The Riverside Press.
1875


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1874, by
GEORGE CARY EGGLESTON
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

RIVERSIDE, CAMBRIDGE:
STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY
H. O. HOUGHTON AND COMPANY.

DEDICATION.

I WISH to dedicate this book to my brother, EDWARD EGGLESTON; and even if there were no motives of affection impelling me thereto, I should still feel bound to inscribe his name upon this page, as an act of justice, in order that those critics who confounded me with him, when I put forth a little novel a year ago, may have no chance to hold him responsible for my political as they did for my literary sins.


PREFACE.

LUNCHING one day with Oliver Johnson, the best "original abolitionist" I ever knew, I submitted to him the question I was debating with myself, namely, whether I might write this little volume of reminiscences without fear of offending excellent people, or, still worse, reanimating prejudices that happily were dying. His reply was, "Write, by all means. Prejudice is the first-born of ignorance, and it never outlives its father. The only thing necessary now to the final burial of the animosity existing between the sections is that the North and the South shall learn to know and understand each other. Anything which contributes to this hastens the day of peace and harmony and brotherly love which every good man longs for."


Page vi

Upon this hint I have written, and if the reading of these pages shall serve, in never so small a degree, to strengthen the kindly feelings which have grown up of late between the foemen of ten years ago, I shall think my labor well expended.

I have written chiefly of the things I saw for myself, and yet this is in no sense the story of my personal adventures. I never wore a star on my collar, and every reader of military novels knows that adventures worth writing about never befall a soldier below the rank of major.

G. C. E.

October, 1874.