Our $50 Million Flag


From: SylviasDaddy@comcast.net


Free Times, SC
http://www.free-times.com/index.php?cat=1992912064035856&ShowArticle_ID=11012603083629022


"Why can’t we host an NCAA game?"


Because of the ignorance, bigotry, and prejudice of the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

[all definitions are taken from Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English Language Unabridged (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.; 1981)]


IGNORANCE indicates a lack of knowledge, either in general or of a particular point.


The NCAA lacks the knowledge of the Confederate Battle Flag’s true meaning. They erroneously suppose it to be a symbol of hatred.


BIGOTRY: Obstinate and unreasoning attachment to one’s own belief and opinions with intolerance of beliefs opposed to them.


The NCAA has been informed several times (once by this writer personally) of the true meaning of the Confederate Battle Flag, so their continuing attachment to their erroneous belief is, by definition, obstinate and unreasoning.


PREJUDICE: Unreasonable predilection for or objection against something; or an opinion or leaning adverse to anything without just grounds or before sufficient knowledge; or an irrational attitude of hostility directed against an individual, a group, a race, or their supposed characteristics; or an opinion or judgment formed beforehand or without due examination.


The NCAA’s objection against the Confederate Battle Flag was formed without due examination and before sufficient knowledge. It is founded upon ignorance and obstinately held in the face of information offered. It was formed and is held without just grounds. It constitutes an irrational attitude of hostility directed against Constitutional strict-constructionists as a group.


“I can’t speak for the wishes of the Civil War dead …”


I can speak for the Confederate soldiers, and I do. As a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, I am the designated successor of my great-grandfather Loami Grandberry McLENDON; Private, Company E, 59th Alabama Infantry Regiment (and Acting Ordnance Sergeant of that regiment).


The flag that we know as the Confederate Battle Flag was used by many (but by no means all) Confederate military units during the War for Southern Independence (1861-1865). It was their flag, and they alone had the right to interpret its meaning.


When the War was over, the Confederate soldiers became Confederate veterans. They formed an organization known as the United Confederate Veterans. The Confederate Battle Flag was still their Flag, and they alone had the right to interpret its meaning.


In 1896, since many of the Confederate veterans were aged, infirm, and dying off, the Sons of Confederate Veterans was formed as the successor organization to the United Confederate Veterans. The legacy and authority of the United Confederate Veterans was transferred to them over the next ten years. This transfer of power culminated in a speech given 25 April 1906 at New Orleans, Louisiana by Stephen Dill Lee, Confederate lieutenant-general, and commander-in-chief of the United Confederate Veterans:


To you, Sons of Confederate Veterans, we will commit the vindication of the Cause for which we fought. To your strength will be given the defense of the Confederate soldier’s good name, the guardianship of his history, the emulation of his virtues, the perpetuation of those principles which he loved and which you love also, and those ideals which made him glorious and which you also cherish. Remember, it is your duty to see that the true history of the South is presented to future generations.


Since 25 April 1906, therefore, the Confederate Battle Flag has been the flag of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. They alone have the right to interpret its meaning. They have interpreted its meaning, and explained (repeatedly!) that meaning – and it is not hatred, nor is it bigotry.


The Confederate Battle Flag is not the flag of the Kluxers and other malcontents of their ilk. They do not have the right to interpret its meaning.


The Confederate Battle Flag is not the flag of the NAACP. They do not have the right to interpret its meaning.


The Confederate Battle Flag is not the flag of the NCAA. They do not have the right to interpret its meaning.


The Confederate Battle Flag is not the personal flag of Mr. Ron Aiken. He does not have the right to interpret its meaning. His commentary, therefore, is out of order.


Clifton Palmer McLendon
Spring, Texas