If You Had Behaved Yourselves This Would Not Have Happened
 
From: bernhard1848@att.net
 
It is difficult to imagine the cruelty practiced on American civilians in the South by Northern soldiers—soldiers fighting to save the American Union. The following describes the brutality and barbarity very well, and in detail.
 
Bernhard Thuersam, Director
Cape Fear Historical Institute
www.cfhi.net 

If You Had Behaved Yourselves This Would Not Have Happened
 
“…[T]he Yankees came by the hundreds and destroyed everything that we possessed—every living thing. After they had taken everything out of the house—our clothes, shoes, hats, and even my children’s clothes—my husband was made to take off his boots which a yankee tried on. The shoes would not fit, so the soldier cut them to pieces. They even destroyed the medicine we had.
 
In the cellar, they took six barrels of lard, honey and preserves—and what they did not want, they let the negroes come in and take. They took 16 horses, one mule, all of the oxen, every cow, every plough, even the hoes, and four vehicles. The soldiers filled them with meat and pulled them to camp which was not far from our home. They would kill the hogs in the fields, cut them in halves with the hair on. Not a turkey, duck or chicken was left. My mother in law…was very old and frail and in bed. They went in her bedroom and cursed her. They took all our books and threw them in the woods. I had my silver and jewelry buried in the swamp for two months.
 
We went to Faison Depot and bought an old horse that we cleaned up, fed and dosed, but which died after a week’s care. Then the boys went again and bought an ox. They made something like a plough which they used to finish the crop with. Our knives were pieces of hoop iron sharpened, and our forks were made of cane—but it was enough for the little we had to eat.
 
All of which I have written was the last year and month of the sad, sad war (March and April, 1865). It is as fresh in my memory and all its horrors as if it were just a few weeks ago. It will never be erased from my memory as long as life shall last.
 
I do not and cannot with truth say I have forgotten or that I have forgiven them. They destroyed what they could of the new house and took every key and put them in the turpentine boxes. Such disappointment cannot be imagined. My children would cry for bread, but there was none. A yankee took a piece out of his bag and bit it, and said: “If you had behaved yourselves this would not have happened.”
 
(Story in Sampson Independent, February 1960; The Heritage of Sampson County (NC), Volume I, Oscar Bizzell, editor, pp. 253-254)