From: rwaldburg2@swissinfo.org

I am a southerner by hearth from Germany, please forgive me for writing such a poor English, you may believe my hearth and feelings are pretty close to Dixie and what the Confederacy stood for: the very best in American traditions!!

Looking from Europe to all these liberal campaigns to attack the South and what its heritage means, I think the best response to all this evil minded people is the TRUTH as it was.

For sample: about the Forrest park controversy (based on so many lies about General Nathan B. Forrest) it would be great to get money to put a very big stone with a plaque reproducing the entire 1875 Memphis speech of Forrest about the whites and black people in America. Let the truth sound! Many people may read it, many TV channels may reproduce it, a general discussion about may be started nationwide! Forrest was the very first one to speak about integrating the negroes and live together in a united country, long before Alexander Crummel or Martin Luther King!

Please reproduce my humble proposal, send from an Southerner from Europe who loves America, try to collect money for such a memorial stone, to be erected beside the Forrest statue in his park. Let everybody read and think about the truth!!

Many thanks for your time. God bless you all. Remember the struggle to keep southern heritage in dignity is a sacred duty.

Raphael Waldburg Zeil

Forrest’s speech to the Independent Order of Pole-Bearers Association
July 5, 1875

"Ladies and Gentlemen I accept the flowers as a memento of reconciliation between the white and colored races of the southern states. I accept it more particularly as it comes from a colored lady, for if there is any one on God’s earth who loves the ladies I believe it is myself. ( Immense applause and laughter.) I came here with the jeers of some white people, who think that I am doing wrong. I believe I can exert some influence, and do much to assist the people in strengthening fraternal relations, and shall do all in my power to elevate every man to depress none. (Applause.) I want to elevate you to take positions in law offices, in stores, on farms, and wherever you are capable of going. I have not said anything about politics today. I don’t propose to say anything about politics. You have a right to elect whom you please; vote for the man you think best, and I think, when that is done, you and I are freemen. Do as you consider right and honest in electing men for office. I did not come here to make you a long speech, although invited to do so by you. I am not much of a speaker, and my business prevented me from preparing myself. I came to meet you as friends, and welcome you to the white people. I want you to come nearer to us. When I can serve you I will do so. We have but one flag, one country; let us stand together. We may differ in color, but not in sentiment Many things have been said about me which are wrong, and which white and black persons here, who stood by me through the war, can contradict. Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed I’ll come to your relief. I thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for this opportunity you have afforded me to be with you, and to assure you that I am with you in heart and in hand."