The Heart of the Race Relations Problem
 
From: bernhard1848@gmail.com
 
The disruption of Southern race relations by federal authorities such as the Supreme Court and various imported agitators, has done more harm than good, according to author William D. Workman, Jr (below).  He wrote in 1960 that “In many respects, the refusal of the North to leave the South alone has had a harmful effect upon the very individuals about whom the Northerners profess most concern – that is, the Southern Negro.”  As they “helped” the Southern Negro, they also ruined his good relations with the white neighbors he had to live with.  Bernhard Thuersam
 

The Heart of the Race Relations Problem
 
“More

[problems] can be expected in the future if Northern integrationists, with or without political backing, continue to pillory the white South under the guise of helping the black South.
 
Meanwhile, the harried Southern Negro, who may or may not agree with the fulminations made in his behalf, stands to lose more than he gains.  In most of the South, he is now possessed of all the purely legal rights which are coming his way, and continued agitation from the North can add little to his political status . . . [and] On the other hand, and this has become quite apparent in the last few years, the Negro becomes – willingly or unwillingly – the object of the white Southerner’s resentment.
 
Basically, the white Southerner has little quarrel with his Negro neighbor, and frankly despises the Northern propagandists – including the Supreme Court of the United States – with far greater intensity than is ever directed toward the Negro.
 
When the Northerner preaches the “brotherhood of man,” the Southerner calls for “freedom of association” and proceeds to sever longstanding ties which formerly linked him amicably with his Negro fellow-Southerners.
 
The net result is that the Northern action brings about almost the reverse reaction from that desired. Instead of bringing Southern whites and Negroes closer together, it drives them farther apart since, in the eyes of the white Southerner, the Negro is identified with those forces which seek to pillory and persecute the South.
 
The heart of the problem lies in the achievement of community acceptance of whatever pattern of race relations seems best for that community. [Where] there is not acceptance, no amount of pressure – federal, religious, or otherwise – will bring about a satisfactory situation. The matter of race relations is too close a thing . . . and not a thing to be handled by impersonal formula and governmental edict . . . .
 
In the years preceding the Supreme Court decision of 1954, and in a diminishing degree since then, Southern communities were making notable progress in the expansion of not only racial amity but of bi-racial achievement.  The pressures which have built up following the desegregation decision, however, tended in large measure to “freeze” things as they were, and indeed in many cases to undo the good that had been accomplished by slow, patient work over the years.  
 
Florida’s Gov. LeRoy Collins had this to say in March of 1956:
 
“For as long as I can remember, the Florida A&M [Negro] University choir on Sunday afternoons has held vesper services open to the general public. Many white citizens have over the years attended these concerts with great admiration for the excellence of these Negro voices singing the spirituals of their race.  But this has almost completely stopped, I am advised. The singing still goes on each Sunday, and it is as good as it has ever been, but there are no longer white listeners.  Fear of being labeled integrationists has intimidated them into staying away .
 
These things don’t make good sense but they are happening nevertheless.  They signal not just a halt in the advancement of good race relations, but actually a decided move backward.  They show the insidious results when our people are pulled by one side or the other into the fighting pit of the extremists . . . “
 
(The Case For the South, William D. Workman, Jr., Devin-Adair, 1960, pp. 134-138)