Defending Their Country, the State of Their Birth
 
From: bernhard1848@att.net
 
The spirit of the Founders Declaration of Independence inspired Jefferson Davis to state, at the beginning of a more perfect American union in April of 1861: “We feel that our cause is just and holy; we protest solemnly in the face of mankind that we desire peace at any sacrifice save that of honour and independence; we ask no conquest, no aggrandizement, no concession of any kind from the States with which we were lately confederated; all we ask is to be let alone; that those who never held power over us shall not now attempt our subjugation by arms." Virginia left the old union only after the evil intent of Lincoln was clear, and when political liberty demanded separation from the revolutionary North.
 
Bernhard Thuersam, Director
Cape Fear Historical Institute
www.cfhi.net  

Defending Their Country, the State of Their Birth
 
“When the State of Virginia seceded from the Union on the 17th day of April, 1861, most of her citizens, belonging to the United States Navy, resigned their commissions and offered their services to the State of their birth. 

[I]t was believed by many persons that a large party at the North would oppose the prosecution of a war of subjugation. It will be remembered…how strong had been the party opposed to secession in the Convention then in session at Richmond…[but] The call upon Virginia, by President Lincoln for her quota of troops to aid in subjugating the South, had settled the question [and] she became a member of the Confederacy.
 
I had visited, some months previous to the secession of the State, many of the little villages in New England, where I saw that the population were in terrible earnest. “Wide awake,” and other secret societies were organized; and inflammatory harangues aroused the populace. The favorite theme of the orators was the “martyrdom” of John Brown; the piratical and murderous raid of that fanatic into the State of Virginia being exalted into a praiseworthy act of heroism. When I returned to Virginia and contrasted the apparent apathy and want of preparation there with the state of affairs at the North, I trembled for the result.
 
Volunteers responded with alacrity to the call to defend the State from invasion; and none responded more readily, or served more bravely, than those who had opposed secession in the Convention. It seems invidious to cite particular examples; but the “noblest Trojan of them all” will point a moral, and serve as an exemplar for generations to come. Wise in council, eloquent in debate, bravest and coolest among the brave in battle, and faithful to his convictions in adversity, he still lives to denounce falsehood and wrong. Truly the old hero, in all he says and does, “gives the world assurance of a man.” —I allude to General J. A. Early.”
 
(Narrative of a Blockade Runner, John Wilkinson, Valde Books, 2009, pp. 3-5)