Antebellum Abolition in North Carolina
 
From: bernhard1848@att.net
 
The post-Revolution efforts in the South to emancipate those enslaved by the British colonial system are well-known, though it was slowed by Massachusetts tinkerer Eli Whitney’s invention and New England mills which needed slaves to produce raw cotton. Southerners continued their efforts to mitigate and end the slavery in their midst, though this would stop as they accurately read the evil intent of Northern abolition fanatics—and who they rightly saw as responsible for Nat Turner’s murderous rampage in 1831.  Northern abolitionists, those so concerned with the plight and suffering of the slave in the South, could easily have sought a peaceable end to the institution by encouraging the Southern friends of emancipation.
 
Bernhard Thuersam, Director
Cape Fear Historical Institute
www.cfhi.net 

Antebellum Abolition in North Carolina:
 
“So far as the records show, it was not until 1715 that the General Assembly acknowledged the existence of slavery in the [British] Province [of North Carolina] and gave it a definite legal status. In 1774…the Assembly passed a law which made the willful and malicious killing of slaves punishable upon conviction in the Superior Court by twelve months imprisonment for the first offence, and death without benefit of clergy for the second.
 
This law was amended in 1791, so as to render one convicted of the willful and malicious killing of a slave guilty of murder for the first offence and subject to the same penalty as for the murder of a free man…in 1817, “the offence of killing a slave” was “denominated and considered homicide” [as in] common law.”  Trial by jury was not extended to slaves until 1793…Crimes trivial in their nature, not deserving punishment greater than a whipping, were entrusted to a single magistrate; crimes partaking of a greater degree of turpitude were committed to the original and exclusive jurisdiction of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions…”
 
F.L. Olmsted, perhaps the closest observer of the slave regime in the [1850’s], remarked that slavery in North Carolina had more of a patriarchal character than in any other State. The humanization of the slave code as regards his life and members of slaves may be attributed to numerous causes. In the first place, the increasing monetary value of the slave caused him to be an object of greater solicitude to his master.
 
In the second place…The Quakers [in North Carolina] were almost constantly importuning the legislature to provide more liberal emancipation laws. The American Colonization Society, with several branches in North Carolina, not only worked for the uplift of the free Negro, but after 1825 was equally interested in securing the emancipation of slaves for the purpose of colonizing them in Liberia. The work of the American Colonization Society was ably supplemented by the North Carolina Manumission Society until about 1834, when, as a result of abolition activity in the State this society ceased to exist.
 
From 1783 to 1830, it was not uncommon for distinguished North Carolinians to condemn slavery as a moral and economic blight and to express the desire of seeing it put in the way of ultimate extinction. James Iredell, speaking in behalf of ratifying the Federal Constitution in 1788, went as far as to say that the entire abolition of slavery would be “an event which must be pleasing to every generous mind and every friend of human nature.”
 
The editor of the Raleigh Register, in answering the query “Ought slavery to exist?” said: “We presume but few would answer in the affirmative, and still fewer would be found to advocate the practice as being right in itself or to justify it except on  the broad plea of necessity. That it would conduce equally to the interest and happiness of the slaveholding States to get rid of this part of our population none will deny.”
 
(Humanizing the Slave Code, R.H. Taylor, North Carolina Historical Review, July, 1925, pp. 323-330)