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Virginia Flaggers: HB587/Charlottesville Lee Statue Update

From: Virginia Flagger <info@vaflaggers.com> Date: Fri, Apr 22, 2016 Subject: Va Flaggers: HB587/Charlottesville Lee Statue Update   Legislative update: Wednesday, April 20th: After the House of Delegates easily voted to override Gov. McAuliffe’s Veto of HB587, a bill that would have clarified our monuments and memorials law, Senate Democrats, straight down party lines, goose-stepped with the NAACP and McAuliffe and refused to override the veto. This means that while the law still stands and our monuments are still protected, we will now likely have to spend time and resources in court to get the bill clarified. This also means that the NAACP and others will be scrambling to try and get monuments torn down before the court issues the clarification, just like we are seeing in Charlottesville. Senate Democrats would rather ALL Veterans’ monuments be at risk, than clarify the original intent of a bill that includes protecting Confederate war memorials. What a sad, sad day in the Commonwealth… and a reminder of how important it is to put the right people in office.   The night before the veto override session, the Governor hosted a reception for Democrats in the Governor’s Mansion, actually celebrating his vetoes of bills. He even took the opportunity to put up a billboard at the reception to highlight his actions. Look closely at the billboard and you will note that the veto of the monuments and memorial clarification bill was placed under the category of a victory AGAINST “discrimination”… ​                     We agree with the placement, but for an altogether different reason than the Governor… there is little doubt his veto of the monuments and memorials clarification bill discriminates against veterans!   Charlottesville:   The Save LEE Park/RE Lee Statue Rally and City Council meeting…

Across the South, Confederate statues take their final stand by Jennifer Brett

NEW ORLEANS – For more than 130 years, a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee has towered over the Crescent City from atop a 60-foot marble column. His days there appear to be numbered. The statue, unveiled in 1884 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991, is one of several historic statues with a Confederate connection that the city council has voted to remove. A lawsuit filed in federal court here by the Monumental Task Committee, Louisiana Landmarks Society, Foundation for Historical Louisiana, and Beauregard Camp, No. 130, a chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, has put those plans on hold for the moment. A hearing is scheduled for Jan. 14. The action mirrors discussions and efforts throughout the South, including Atlanta, aimed at dispensing with Confederate imagery. In July 2015, the month after the mass shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal in Charleston that killed nine black worshipers, the Atlanta chapter of the NAACP called for the Confederate engraving to be sandblasted off the side of Stone Mountain. “It is time for Georgia and other Southern states to end the glorification of slavery and white supremacy paid for and maintained with the taxes of all its citizens,” the chapter said in a statement at the time. “NAACP Atlanta chapter is calling for the immediate removal of all Confederate Memorial Monuments maintained by the state of Georgia using taxpayer money.” That proposal didn’t gain much traction. More recently, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed called for local Civil Rights leaders to work out plans to erect a monument honoring Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. atop Stone Mountain. Elsewhere, efforts to scrub the South of its Confederate heritage include a proposal to remove “Silent Sam,” a bronze statue on the campus of the University of North Carolina at…

Kutztown University lifting unconstitutional ban on Confederate flag

Kutztown University has just announced that it’s lifting its ban on Confederate flags (and Nazi flags), a ban that extended even into students’ own dorm rooms:   Kutztown University recently announced a proposed change to its housing decoration policy restricting the display of symbols that promote messages inconsistent with the values of the university. Upon learning of the change, university legal counsel asked us to refrain from implementing the policy in order to permit a review for constitutionality. As a result of this review, references to any specific content, such as symbols, will be removed from the policy. The university will educate our students and other members of our community, so they will understand the historical and modern context for these symbols, and we will continue to advocate for an environment wherein all those associated with our university can feel valued and safe.   I still don’t like universities’ use of “safe” to mean “safe from offensive speech.” But at least the First Amendment violation is apparently going away.   UPDATE: Note that if the university is planning on keeping the other part of the policy — “[a]ll decorations in common areas in the residence hall and apartments must take into consideration that obscene, distasteful displays which are demeaning to an individual’s or group’s race, ethnic, religious background, and/or gender or ability, will not be permitted and will be removed immediately” — that too would violate the First Amendment, as the earlier post explained.   UPDATE: A commenter suggested that a university could ban Confederate flags, because of the Supreme Court’s recent decision allowing Texas not to print Confederate flag plates as part of its specialty license plate program. But that’s not right: Viewpoint-based restrictions on people’s speech are unconstitutional, even when the government is specifying which signs people may…

Robert E. Lee’s Name to Remain on Texas School

Robert E. Lee’s Name Will Remain on NEISD High School Posted Tuesday, December 8th 2015 @ 12pm The name of Confederate General Robert E. Lee will remain on a North East ISD High School, News Radio 1200 WOAI’s Morgan Montalvo reports. The board voted 5-2 not to change the name of Robert E. Lee High School following several hours of emotional debate from members of the public, and members of the board. “How do we really care about growing out minority students in school, when minority students have to make a choice about going to a school named Robert E. Lee?” said Chris Herring, who organized the effort to change the name of the school. Letti Bresnahan, the President of the NEISD Board of Education, who voted against the name change, said the Administration instead will launch an effort to weed out any evidence of racism or racial indignities in the district’s facilities. “There might be some symbols and some icons that maybe should be removed, symbols that have been adopted by groups that represent racial hatred and racial divide, and we don’t want that in our schools,” she said. Herring says if they really want to wipe out ‘racial hatred’ they don’t have to look any further than the name on the school building itself. “Robert E. Lee is a symbol, Robert E. Lee is a sign, Robert E. Lee represents the Confederacy,” he said. Last night’s vote closes the issue of renaming the high school. The issue of how the USA recognizes and honors figures who are associated with the Confederacy burst into the public eye earlier this year when a Confederate flag waving white supremecist shot and killed nine people in a historic African American church in South Carolina. While Confederate President Jefferson Davis and other Confederate figures have had their…

VA Flaggers: Mechanicsville Christmas Parade

Over the years, we have enjoyed participating in the Mechanicsville Christmas Parade.  It is always very Confederate friendly, and we receive a warm welcome and support from organizers and spectators.  We had to wonder, with the PC anti-Confederate backlash set in motion since Governor Haley stripped the Confederate Flag from the Confederate Monument in Columbia almost 5 months ago, if things might be different this year.  Turns out it was VERY different, but not in the way we might have guessed.. From the moment we stepped off and offered the first child a stick flag, we were literally swarmed with kids (and adults!) wanting flags.  Before we had gotten halfway through the parade route we had given out over 1,000 flags, and exhausted our supply. ​General Jackson was a huge hit with the kids! Over 50 strong, our group was the first in a series of Confederate units that were grouped together in the parade. The Edmund Ruffin Fire-Eaters Color Guard led our unit, and almost as soon as the flags came into sight, we could hear the crowd start to roar! The scene was repeated over and over again as we were met with rousing cheers and enthusiastic support throughout the entire parade, much more so than in previous years. ​We were greeted with shouts of “God bless y’all”  “Keep it flying” and many, many expressions of thanks. For our Flaggers, it was a welcome and much needed break from dealing with the hate, bigotry, and abuse they often face on the front lines.  The overwhelmingly positive response and show of love and support was a great boost and almost every participant commented on the incredible experience. ​We were absolutely stunned…and thrilled…at the outpouring of support and encouragement. Pay no attention to the haters, folks…Dixie is alive and well…and…

BUSTED! SPLC’s Fabricated Hate Crimes Brought to Light

BUSTED! SPLC’s Dothan Police Drug Planting Claim Is A Hoax DECEMBER 3, 2015 “Leaked documents reveal Dothan, Ala., police planted drugs on young black men for years.” Southern Poverty Law Center [SPLC] December 2nd, 2015 Left-wing websites have been buzzing about a claim that over twelve Dothan, AL police officers framed innocent black men. The officers allegedly planted drugs on innocent black victims for years.  Most cited the SPLC as their source. The SPLC pushed the allegation on their website and on their twitter account. Now the SPLC has been forced to admit that their accusations are totally without merit. The websites of the Montgomery Advertiser, Dothan Eagle, Washington Post, and Slate.com have all blasted the SPLC for spreading a hoax! A humiliated SPLC spokesman confessed to reporters that they have not seen the alleged documents and that “we have no information to substantiate … claims.” SPLC employees immediately scrubbed a bunch of odious tweets that pushed the false claims. However, currently the SPLC website still contains a statement saying that the fake story is true. The SPLC is a fake civil rights organization that has raked in hundreds of millions of dollars by claiming that a few thousand KKK members and Neo-Nazis pose a large immediate threat to all of society. Recently the national spokesman for the Anti-Defamation League slammed the SPLC. He said that the SPLC’s claims about Neo-Nazis are “wildly inflated.” Last October a Florida judge ordered the SPLC to pay $130k to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department for filing a frivolous lawsuit. The Judge slammed the SPLC writing that the group used ““untrue, heightened, and emotional language . . . to conceal their lack of a case.” On October 19th, 2015 the SPLC falsly claimed that white racists were trying to burn down black churches in St….

UNLV president says school needs to keep Rebel name

UNLV president says school needs to keep Rebel name; no ties to Confederacy Published November 30, 2015 Associated Press Facebook45 Twitter0 Email Print Feb. 1, 2014: In this file photo, UNLV mascot Hey Reb warms up the crowd before an NCAA college basketball game in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken) CARSON CITY, Nev. –  UNLV President Len Jessup said the school needs to keep “Rebels” as its nickname in spite of calls for its removal, citing newly released historical research that concluded the moniker is not a reference to the Confederacy. Jessup issued a statement Monday saying the name embodies UNLV’s entrepreneurial spirit, and noting overwhelming support for the nickname and the “Hey Reb!” mascot. “It was coined as our young institution was fighting to establish its own identity, and it has come to represent the very independence and spirit that embodies both UNLV and Southern Nevada,” Jessup wrote in a message to the UNLV community. “It is clear that ‘Rebels’ is central to our shared identity and represents the broadest definition of the term.” Some have called for the name and mascot to be changed, saying the mustachioed, cowboy hat-wearing character appears to be a Confederate soldier. The university embarked on a formal research effort this summer after Democratic Sen. Harry Reid said regents should re-examine the Rebel nickname — comments made in the aftermath of an allegedly racially motivated mass shooting at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. The mascot also became a flashpoint during an on-campus demonstration organized in mid-November to show solidarity with protesters at the University of Missouri. UNLV Chief Diversity Officer Rainier Spencer finalized a 60-page research paper on the topic earlier this month, concluding the Rebel name emerged from southern Nevada students’ frustrations in the 1950s that the Legislature wasn’t investing as much in…

Stealth Fighter

Stealth Fighter This Cuban woman toiled as a man in the Civil War. So why has no one heard of her? Loreta Janeta Velazquez sounded like a mythical figure: a Cuban-born woman raised in New Orleans, where she masqueraded as a male soldier and fought in the Civil War. With a fake mustache, beard, and a soldier’s uniform, the Latina enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1861 as Lieutenant Harry T. Buford , without her husband’s knowledge. “When I heard about Loreta, I was like, ` Why would a Cuban woman join the Confederacy? What is a Velazquez doing in 19th – century America?’ " says Maria Agui Carter , a filmmaker and former producer for WGBH-TV (Channel 2). That intrigue led Carter on a historical and personal journey into the life of this un- Southern belle. Carter learned that Velazquez didn’t just fight as a soldier in the historic battles of Bull Run and Shiloh, but posed as a spy after she was wounded during service. Velazquez chronicled her adventures as a soldier in a 600-page memoir called “The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier." The book, brought back into print three years ago, features rare images of Velazquez as both a woman and a man. Velazquez’s colorful unsung life had the makings of a good documentary film, Carter thought. And so “Rebel" was born. Carter, who runs her production company, Iguana Films, in the basement of her Newton home, spent the past four years researching Velazquez’s life with fellowships at Harvard and Tulane universities. With funding from PBS and other grants, she and her crew shot reenactment s in New Orleans’s French Quarter and are shooting the last batch of scenes in Waltham, Milton, and Concord. Carter hopes…

Branson, MO

Dixie Outfitters Southern Heritage Franchise Store Branson, Missouri Watch a TV commercial  that spotlights the Branson store (this will be airing on the local travel channel in Branson). Cooter Returns To The Ozarks.  Ben Jones of "Dukes of Hazzard" fame visited the Branson store, August 9 & 10. CLICK HERE to view photos of the Branson, Missouri store. Store information coming soon.

Birds Of A Feather?

John Grisham and Morris Dees: Birds of a Feather? Al Benson Jr. 19 August 2009 A couple years ago someone gave me a copy of one of John Grisham’s books which I really enjoyed. After reading it I picked up several more, some at used book stores. They were well written and Grisham could spin an interesting yarn that held your attention, especially about lawyers, since he had once been one. Although I didn’t totally agree with all of his viewpoints, nonetheless I felt that in many instances he attempted to understand the Southern mindset, and he lived here, not up in New York or out in Hollyweird. He also wrote about some places I have been to, the Mississippi Delta country, Memphis, Northeast Arkansas, and a few other spots. As you read his books you could picture some of the places he wrote about, and it was, in a sense, almost an armchair vacation to read some of his stuff. I realized that, being a best–selling author, he’d have to have somewhat caved in to the current gods of political correctness, but it seemed he had done so without making a big deal of it. All of that being said, very recently, I took my entire stock of John Grisham books and turned them in at our local used book store. Henceforth, no Grisham books will line my bookshelves. I have to admit, I hadn’t thought very much about John Grisham’s political views beyond the fact that they probably weren’t quite the same as mine. Someone had told me he was a Christian and I thought, somewhere along the line, I had read that he had taught Sunday School. But, then, so did Jimmy Carter and that was no recommendation for him. Whatever he did or didn’t do, I…

Superbowl Fried Chicken

Sunday, February 06, 2005 BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post Patriots and Eagles supporters may come and go, but fried chicken will always have diehard fans. At Jacksonville’s Beach Road Chicken Dinners, just across the St. Johns River from Alltel Stadium, site of today’s Super Bowl XXXIX, the biscuits are tall and light, the cream peas’ recipe is held close, and the main attraction’s so tasty that folks pay extra for a side order of its crumbs (93 cents). Don’t let the fact that Beach Road Chicken sits on Atlantic Boulevard – not the parallel-running, latter-day Beach Boulevard – get in your way. "We were on the road to get to the beach," says Ken Ferger, who manages the catering side of his wife Tena’s business. "People referred to it as `the beach road.’ We’ll get calls from customers who still say, `I’m on Beach Boulevard. Where are you?’" Southern Living magazine readers have had no trouble finding the restaurant over the years, ranking its fare among the South’s best fried chicken as recently as last fall. The restaurant looks like a house that’s been added to in stages, except that it’s surrounded by asphalt lots on either side and out back. Sit in the main dining room, on the porch or close to the kitchen hallway – it’s all simple, plain and familiar, since 1939. On Sundays, the only day Beach Road is open for lunch and dinner, the lines form quickly out front and at the takeout window in the rear. But those lines move, a feat Ferger attributes in part to the likes of Marjie Harrison and Gloria Bartley. They’ve been carrying family-style platters for more than four decades. They call you "hon" and get the unsweetened tea refills right. Beach Road’s also never bothered with a…

Our Heritage

This is our heritage By Patrice Stewart DAILY Staff Writer Recalling what families and fathers who became fighters went through during the Civil War is important to Kay McCarley. "This is our heritage, and we feel it’s important to get the message out, although anything Confederate gets such bad press now," said McCarley, president of Joe Wheeler Chapter No. 291 of United Daughters of the Confederacy. "This is not a racist organization, although many people try to make it out to be," she said. "Slavery may have been a part of the Civil War, but it was so much more than that. "Most of them were just ordinary people," she said. "Ninety percent of the men who fought never owned a slave — they fought because we were invaded by the North, and they were fighting for their families and homes, not to own slaves." McCarley, an 18-year member, said she has always been interested in history and her ancestors. Other local members range from a 17-year-old high school student to a woman in her 80s who joined 56 years ago. "It’s a lineage society, and it’s difficult to get all the records for several generations," she said. They use military records, census records, birth and death certificates, marriage records and more. Some states have African-American members, she said, and the late Sen. Strom Thurmond’s daughter is completing her paperwork to join. McCarley believes UDC may be the oldest women’s — or perhaps any type — organization in Decatur, since it has been meeting continually since 1899. "We are not a do-nothing society," she said. "We honor all veterans." In addition to fund-raisers over the past year to raise money for the new fence and historical marker dedicated Tuesday, they send money to support about nine daughters of Confederate veterans,…

Southern Parties Links

Southern Parties Links Georgia Division Sons Of Confederate Veterans Elect Mike Crane      Senate District 51 (GA) North Carolina League of the South The Southern Party of Georgia      "A grass roots effort to restore Good Government for the People of Georgia." Sons of Confederate Veterans      "Preserving the history and legacy of the citizen-soldiers who fought for the Confederacy ." Sons of Confederate Veterans – Camp 469 General Nathan Bedford Forrest Camp # 469 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans located in Rome, GA. The Confedrate War Department      "This site is dedicated to any interest in the War Between the States…" Sons of Confederate Veterans – Camp 2022 Capt. James Knox Camp #2022 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans – the Seaboard Guards – located in Waynesville, GA. CSA-E Confederate States of America – Europe

National Institution Of Africa

A National Institution of Africa   From: Bernhard1848@att.net   Though the sin of African slavery has been passed off wholly to the American South, it doesn’t take much sweeping to uncover the truth. None of the slavers anchoring in the Gulf of Benin hoisted Confederate Battle Flags, and the African kings accepted no Confederate notes.   Bernhard Thuersam, Executive Director Cape Fear Historical Institute Post Office Box 328 Wilmington, NC 28402 www.CFHI.net A National Institution of Africa:   "It would be a task of many pages if I attempted to give a full account of the origin and causes of slavery in Africa. As a national institution, it seems to have existed always (It still exists (1928). In Liberia, the country of free Negroes, there are over two hundred thousand slaves. In Sierra Leone, the other freemen’s colony, slavery was abolished on January 1 of this year…).   Africans have been bondsmen everywhere: and the oldest monuments bear their images linked with menial toils and absolute servitude…(slavery in Africa)…has now ripened into an absolute necessity; so that man, in truth has become the coin of Africa. England to-day, with all her philanthropy, sends under the Cross of St. George…her Birmingham muskets, Manchester cottons and Liverpool lead, all of which are swapped at Sierra Leone, Acra, and on the Gold Coast, for Spanish or Brazilian bills on London. Yet, what British merchant does not know the traffic on which those bills are founded, and for whose support his wares are purchased? (W)hile multitudes of our own worthy traders, who would hang a slaver as a pirate when caught, (they) do not hesitate to supply him indirectly with tobacco, powder, cotton, Yankee rum and New England notions, in order to bait the trap in which he may be caught.   (Y)et, if…

No Traitors

Free Traders, Not Traitors — Economic Issues And The War For Southern Independence By: John Sophocleus The quickest way to sort the Rebels from the Yanks is with this simple question: Who was the last president of the United States? Any Southerner who is worth his/her salt knows (or intuitively understands) that James Buchanan was the fifteenth and last president to preside over a voluntary coalition of sovereign states under a compact called the Constitution of the United States. Eleven of these sovereign states, believing they were free to leave this coalition, formed a new coalition in 1861 and struggled to carry on the tradition of free association until 1865. Slowly, these states were forced back into what is now an involuntary coalition of states under a revised Constitution. This transition from a voluntary coalition adopted in 1789 to a forced coalition of states was completed with the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. This simple distinction between a voluntary government where one is free to exit, and a despotic government where one is forced to remain seems to escape many — particularly when applied to one’s own government. Even our language provides evidence of a subconscious acceptance of this loss of freedom as author Shelby Foote points out the poor but completely accepted grammar to say the ‘United States is,’ instead of the ‘United States are.’ Few have been taught the legacy of the Southern Patriots of 1861 and the events that led to their firing upon Fort Sumter. It is largely over the difference between free trade and forced exchange. The issues of free trade, open shipping lanes and taxes were often inseparable even back to the days of the Pharaohs. The word ‘freedom’ in ancient times referred to one’s tax status. These same issues were an integral part…

History Month

  Black History Month In Florida With The Sparacino’s and the Hurst’s and their family and communities The Mayors name was Tank in this small Florida Town called Cross City, he stood over 6′ 9” tall in my estimation , and was as tall in stature as he greeted Terry Lee and I ; as were all those we were so graciously introduced to by our host and brother, Commander Joe Sparacino of the Dixie Defenders Camp # 2086 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Terry Lee soon began to refer to Joe as the Mayor, because Joe knew everyone, and commanded by his presence a great deal of admiration and respect from them all, no matter their race or religion. I knew we were in for a good time when there setting on the court house steps was a black granite stone with the Ten Commandments inscribed ; having just been interviewed by a pretty and very knowledgeable Southern woman , Terri, from the local Newspaper, the Dixie Advocate ; and now being lead through the City Hall by Joe, with my Flag in hand ; it just couldn’t get any better than this; so I thought, as Terry Lee and I readied for the Black History Luncheon sponsored by the Dixie Defenders Camp # 2086 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, (of which Joe was the Commander) the following afternoon. There are not words that come to mind that can adequately describe just what happened, or what it felt like to be in the Community Center on the Saturday afternoon in February in Cross City, Florida when the Dixie Defenders, one of the smallest Camps in the Sons reached out in a Herculean effort to celebrate Black History Month with it’s community. The film of that great day…

Flags At Bayview Cemetery

Confederate Flags at Historic Old Bayview Cemetery Has Neighbors Upset Erik Rosales Story Created: May 1, 2008 (Corpus Christi, May 1, 2008) At one time, The Old Bayview cemetery was the community burial ground for early Corpus Christi. In it are graves of pioneer settlers, veterans of the war of 1812, the Texas war for independence, the civil war, and even later conflicts. According to the Old Bayview Cemetery web site it’s also the oldest federal cemetery in Texas layed out by U.S. Army engineers while General and future President of the U.S. Zachary Taylor and his men were camped just before the Mexican War. But an someone’s way of honoring it’s Confederate history, has some in the community crying foul. There are Confederate flags placed near the markers of former Confederate soldiers. Wanda Gonzales attends Saint Mathews Baptist Church, a congregation that’s predominately African American. The church is located just down the street from the cemetery. She and others saw a group place the flags on the graves this past weekend. They don’t know what group it was. Church members say they understand its part of history, but it’s a history they don’t want to be reminded of on a daily basis. They are asking the organization who put them up, to take them down. Kiii-TV News is now asking those who put up the flags to give us a call.   On The Web: http://www.kiiitv.com/news/topstories/18474309.html