Black Confederates


Documentary featuring Nelson W. Winbush, a black son of confederate black soldier Luis Napoleon Nelson

Documentary featuring Nelson W. Winbush, a black son of confederate black soldier Luis Napoleon Nelson who fought under Nathan Bedford Forest, founder of the KKK. A series of interviews, documentation, stock footage, and reenactments all collaberate to help defend the Confederacy and it’s soldiers against it’s notorious reputation in regards to black slavery and what the confederate flag actually stood for.

Remembering Ex-Slaves In The Confederate Army

  Friday, Feb. 13, 2015 Museum of Waxhaws remembers ex-slaves in Confederate Army By John Anderson The Museum of the Waxhaws will offer an interesting and thought-provoking program 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 21. In conjunction with Black History Month, the museum will present insights and perspectives on African-Americans who fought in the Civil War – on the Confederate side. Regular museum admission applies. The documentary “Colored Confederates” will be shown at 10 a.m. and again at 12:30 p.m. Earl Ijames, curator of community and black history at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, will introduce the film and be available to answer questions and moderate discussion. Ijames wrote and produced the film. A good portion of his documentary covers the Union County Confederate Pensioners of Color Monument dedication and interviews the two Union County people primarily responsible for getting the monument approved, Tony Way and Patricia Poland. It also provides additional examples of other blacks who served within the Confederacy. At 11:30 a.m. that same day, Teresa E. Roane, archivist at the United Daughters of the Confederacy Library in Richmond, Va., will present “Minorities – Combat Support Confederate Army.” According to the UDC website, Roane earned a bachelor’s in history at Virginia Commonwealth University. Roane says that in her research of the National Archives she “has found numerous records of minorities serving in Confederate units.” Patricia Poland, a genealogy & local history librarian with the Union County Public Library, will present “Finding Aaron Perry: A Union County Slave in the CSA,” at 2 p.m. on Feb. 21. Perry is one of nine former slaves and one freedman who are memorialized on the marble monument outside the county courthouse in Monroe that is inscribed: “In Memory of Union County’s Confederate Pensioners of Color.” Poland shared her thoughts in a…

Saluting Blacks

A salute to black confederates By Lance Spradlin We at the Colonel Thomas Alonzo Napier Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp #2040 and the Mrs. Mary Ann Forrest Order of Confederate Rose Society #3 would like to honor all those who took up arms and fought for the Confederate Army in all branches of the Confederate States of America during the 1861-65 period in “the war of northern aggression”. Although this is documented throughout the War of the Rebellion Records from the first shot fired till then end of the war, it is not brought up by many who teach history or discuss history. This is a tragic loss to future generations who study American History and to those who like to learn about history. There is a book at the Humphreys County Library titled Forgotten Confederates – An Anthology About Black Southerners. It contains names of black confederates from Tennessee and other states as well. Many black southerners were actually free and even those who were slaves would ask to take their masters place and stay home with their families or they would go with their master(s). Some would stay to take care of the farm or plantation land and protect and even die in defense of the land they worked and lived on as well when homes were invaded by the northern soldiers. Black Confederates were also paid, clothed, ate and furnished the same weapons as their white, Native American Indian tribes (the Cherokee being the largest), Irish, Jew, Hispanic and Scottish counterparts. They all shared the same amount of work load in preparing for an attack or preparing defense lines, bridges, etc. Southern generals such as Gen. Robert E. Lee, Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, and Gen. Patrick Cleburne to name a few all pushed to enlist blacks early…

Black Response

How Did Black Southerners Respond When War Was Declared? By: Vernon R. Padgett, Ph.D. When the war started in 1861 there were public demonstrations of support for the Confederacy by blacks throughout the South (Wesley, 1937, p. 141; Rollins, 1994, p. 2). The largest demonstration came in New Orleans. A mass meeting attended by black residents was held just after the news arrived from Fort Sumter. They organized a regiment of black Confederate troops with black officers (New Orleans Picayune, 24 Nov 1861; Annual Cyclopedia, 1864, p. 202.) In Nashville a company of free blacks offered their services to the Confederate government, and in June the state legislature authorized Gov. Harris to accept into Tennessee service all male persons of color (Wesley, 1937, page 153). In Memphis in ‘September a procession of several hundred free blacks marched through the streets under the command of Confederate officers. "They were brimful of patriotism, shouting for Jeff Davis and singing war songs" (Memphis Avalanche, 3 Sept 1861). In Montgomery, blacks were seen being drilled and armed for military duty (Wesley, 1919, p. 242). Two companies of black Confederates were formed in Ft. Smith, Arkansas (Rebellion Record, 46, in Rollins 1994). Similar occurrences took place in Virginia. In Lynchburg, 70 men enlisted to fight for the defense of Virginia soon after it seceded; a local newspaper raised "three cheers for the patriotic Negroes of Lynchburg" (Ibid; Wesley, 1937, p. 142). One hundred free Negroes reported for service to aid the Confederacy in Petersburg, Virginia, on 26 April 1861, and were addressed by the mayor. One of the Negroes stepped forward to receive the Confederate flag, and said “We are willing to aid Virginia’s cause to the utmost of our ability … there is not an unwilling heart among us … we promise unhesitating obedience…

R.E.LEE on Blacks

Robert E. Lee on Black Confederate Troops In the waning days of the Civil War, Gen. Robert E. Lee disclosed his thoughts on the subject of Negroes as soldiers for the Confederacy. In the waning days of the Civil War, when desperation drove the Confederacy to enlist Negroes in her army, General Robert E. Lee disclosed his thoughts on the subject of Negroes as soldiers in two remarkable letters to Lieutenant General Richard S. Ewell. The letters were written by Charles Marshall, Lee’s assistant adjutant general, but the thoughts expressed are clearly Lee’s. In addition, these letters provide rare insights into the unexpected difficulties encountered by the Confederacy in wresting slaves from their owners to preserve a last, slim hope of a Southern Confederacy. The original letters are located in the Richards S. Ewell Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress. Hd Qs CS Armies 27th March 1865 Lt Gen RS Ewell Commdg General, General Lee directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 25th inst: and to say that he much regrets the unwillingness of owners to permit their slaves to enter the service. If the state authorities can do nothing to get those negroes who are willing to join the army, but whose masters refuse their consent, there is no authority to do it at all. What benefit they expect their negroes to be to them, if the enemy occupies the country, it is impossible to say. He hopes you will endeavor to get the assistance of citizens who favor the measure, and bring every influence you can to bear. When a negro is willing, and his master objects, there would be less objection to compulsion, if the state has the authority. It is however of primary importance that the negroes should know that the service…

Two For One

"Civil War group holds ‘two for one’ meeting" From: colonel@37thtexas.org To: sdneditor@starkvilledailynews.com, Mballard@Library.Msstate.Edu According to your article Professor Smith, "…carefully laid out the argument groups use to insist there were black Confederate soldiers and then methodically demolished it. There was, he said, absolutely no historical documentation to support such a claim…which provided further insight into the mythology of slaves allegedly fighting in the Confederate army — to continue their enslavement." There are two immediate problems with "Professor" Smith’s statements. One problem with the assertion about "…slaves allegedly fighting in the Confederate army — to continue their enslavement" is that Free Blacks and slaves fought for the American Revolution in the 18th Century and fought again in the War of 1812. They also fought in the Mexican War of 1845, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, World War 1, and World War 2 while they were still subject to extreme racial separatism and discrimination. Should we suppose that they were fighting before the Civil War to preserve slavery and after the War to preserve racism and discrimination? Japanese-Americans fought in World War 2 even while their families were imprisoned for the sin of having slanted eyes. Should we suppose they were fighting to keep their families imprisoned? In all of these cases the motivation was to prove that they and their descendants deserved freedom and rights. That is why those Free People of Color in the South (130,000 per the U.S. Census of 1860) fought and why the slaves who did fight fought for the South. Now to the second issue stated first by the so-called "Professor" Smith, his allegation that there is "…absolutely no historical documentation to support such a claim." One should be very careful about making such statements of absolutes when one chooses not to perform proper research…

Blacks Support

    BLACK CONTRIBUTIONS IN THE "CRADLE OF SECESSION" ©2002 Brian Lee Merrill (merrill@clicksouth.net) Introduction When one thinks of Blacks in Confederate Charleston, he or she immediately conjures up images of downtrodden slaves who toil on their masters’ behalf. While working in defense of the city they wait patiently for the chance to bolt to the Union when the opportunity presents itself. Where this scenario was certainly accurate in a number of cases, we seldom hear of those Blacks, free and slave, who were instrumental in the Confederate defense of the harbor and city, and in a surprising number of cases, of their own free will. We are shown a sea of White faces in Forts Sumter, Moultrie, and Johnson. We are told of the White slave masters who press their slaves to produce material for the Whites at the front lines. What about those Blacks in Charleston who do not compliment politically correct ideals? Their memories cry out for honor and recognition just as much as the Union’s 54th Massachusetts Colored Infantry and runaway slaves who became successful after freedom, all of whom are trumpeted to great glory by modern history texts. Hopefully, this publication will be a modest start toward recognition of these great men and women. The Slaves With the fascination of the War for Southern Independence continually growing in intensity and instance, more and more information is being uncovered that documents the service of loyal Southern slaves, but unfortunately many remain mentioned, but not named. One who honors the memory of all those who sacrificed for Confederate Charleston can only hope that these nameless heroes will get their earned recognition and deserved honor with further research and future discoveries. Nameless heroes such as the Negro casualties cited numerously in the Official Records: FORT SUMTER, July 19, 1864…

History Outline

Regimental History Outline Black Confederates of Co. F, 33rd Regiment NCST, "Dixie Invincibles" Robert W. Hester Lt. Comdr., Camp 1695, Sons of Confederate Veterans Belhaven, North Carolina September 11, 1996 As more and better information bobs to the surface concerning the War Between The States, the more we realize the distortions of truth presented in schools for many decades. The prevailing view we find to be absorbed with myth rather than fact. One myth concerns the involvement of Black Southerners in the armies of the Confederacy. That they willfully and enthusiastically supported the Confederate States is simply inconceivable to most Americans Recently several publications have given proof of the loyalty to the Confederate Cause of tens of thousands of Black Southerners. Due to the fact Blacks were "unofficial" participants in the Southern Armies, records of their actions are difficult to find. Recently Camp (1695) Commander S.D.Latham provided me copies of some original purchase sheets of food and clothing for the "Dixie Invincibles" by Captain Thomas Mayhew. The time period is from August 30, 1861 to September 14, 1861 and lists 49 soldiers of Co. F receiving various items such as pants, shoes, caps, and so on. From the enlistment roster we know that 96 men officially enlisted in Co. F at Middletown, Hyde Co., N.C. on September 9, 1861. The outfitting of the balance of the enlisted company probably occurred on other dates, or the men reported with their own uniforms. I compared the 49 soldiers receiving clothing with the enlistment roster and found 3 of the 49 not present on the roster, even though we know them to be present at the time. Also, there occurs small "x’s" to the left side of their names. Why were they not a part of the official roster? The 3 were John…

Flies For Freedom

Men say Rebel flag flies for freedom TIM ISBELL THE SUN HERALD For an hour, the Confederate battle flag flew over the former site of the Eight Flags Display on U.S. 90. Dressed in Confederate gray, a black man named Anthony Hervey marched with the banner clutched in his hands. His brother, Harry, accompanied him, wearing jeans and a Robert E. Lee T-shirt. Hervey’s devotion to the flag began when he discovered that a great-great-uncle, James Hervey, was a black American who fought for the Confederacy during the American Civil War. James Hervey served in the Army of Mississippi and was killed at the battle of Shiloh. Further research helped Hervey discover records of at least 100,000 black Confederates who fought in the war. "I am marching for freedom," Hervey said. "The battle flag stands for freedom and states’ rights. The U.S. flag is the flag of slavery. It flew over 100 years of slavery, and Native Americans were annihilated under that flag." For his march, Hervey chose the site where a Confederate flag once stood, one of eight representing entities that have governed the Coast. Harrison County removed the flags because of protests over the Confederate flag, a racist symbol to many, flying on the public beach. Hervey’s crusade also has taken him to Jackson. In the Jackson City Council chambers June 13, Hervey showed up wearing his battle grays, wrapped in the flag. A scuffle erupted between a Jackson man, who said he supported Hervey, and a city councilman who exchanged words, according to published reports. Hervey was not involved in the shoving match. Hervey sees a correlation between the past and today’s controversies over the flag. "We currently live under a psychological form of reconstruction," he said. "Whites are made to feel guilty for sins of their…

Tribute To Man In Black

A Tribute To The Man In Black Comrade C. C. Cumming of Fort Worth, Texas, writes that Bob and Alf Taylor have just passed through the Fort in their double role of "Yankee Doodle and Dixie," and a crowded house greeted them, laughing and crying alternately at the comedy and tragedy of the "Old South" crucified under the Southern Cross, "for," as Bob says, so truly, "it is the old, old South, with the print of the nails of its crucifixion in its hands." He brought to the memory of the gray heads the old "Black Mammy," and spoke of the monument in the future that would be erected to her memory for her faithfulness before and during the great struggle. This revives the memory of a faithful man in black who followed me through from First Manassas, Leesburg, where he assisted in capturing the guns we took from Baker, to the Peninsular, the Seven Days before Richmond, Fredericksburg, the bombardment of the city December 11, and the battle, two days after, at Marye’s Heights; to Chancellorsville, the storming of Harper’s Ferry, and the terrible struggle at Sharpsburg (Antietam now), and last, Gettysburg. Here he lost his life by his fidelity to me-his “young marster" and companion. We were reared together on "de ole plantation" in “Massippi." I was wounded in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg on the second day. The fourth day found us retreating in a cold, drizzling rain. George had found an ambulance, in which I, Sergeant Major of the Seventeenth Mississippi, and Col. Holder of that regiment, still on this side of the river, and an officer of the Twenty-first Mississippi, whose name escapes me, embarked for the happy land of Dixie. All day long we moved slower than any funeral train over the pike, only…

Amos Rucker

Amos Rucker, Black Confederate On August 10, 1905, Amos, Rucker, a ex-Confederate soldier and proud member of the United Confederate Veterans, died in Atlanta, Georgia. His friends of the UCV had previously bought a grave site and marker for he and his wife Martha who had limited income. Amos Rucker was one of many thousands of Black Southerners who fought for the South during the War Between the States. Amos was a servant and best friend to Sandy Rucker. Both men joined the 33rd Georgia Regiment when the South was invaded. Amos fought as a regular soldier and sustained wounds to his breast and one of his legs that left him permanently crippled. Amos Rucker joined the W.H.T. Walker Camp of the United Confederates after the war in Atlanta, Georgia. He would faithfully attend the meetings that were held on the second Monday of each month at 102 Forsyth Street. He was able to remember the name of every man of his old 33th Regiment and would name them and add whether they were living or dead. Amos Rucker and wife Martha felt that the men of the United Confederate Veterans were like family. Rucker said that, "My folks gave me everything I want." The UCV men helped Amos and wife Martha with a house on the west side of Atlanta and John M. Slaton helped with his will and care for his wife. Slaton was a member of Atlanta’s John B. Gordon Camp 46 Sons of Confederate Veterans and was governor of Georgia when he commuted the death sentence of Leo Frank. Funeral services for Amos Rucker was conducted by former Confederate General and Reverend Clement A. Evans. A article about the funeral related that Rucker was clothed in a gray Confederate uniform and a Confederate flag covered his…

Forced To Fight?

Were Blacks “Forced to Fight” for the Confederacy? By: Vernon R. Padgett, Ph.D. Some historians, and students of history, will grudgingly admit that some blacks did fight for the South, but will add that they were “forced” to fight. The implication is that their service is diminished, or dismissed, if they were “forced” to fight. Were blacks forced to fight for the Confederacy? Let us look at six sets of facts: 1. Many Blacks Were Free Men of Color Not all blacks were slaves— the number that were Free Men of Color is given as low as 186,000 (C. H. Wesley) and as high as 500,000 (Dr. Edward Smith). These estimates are of 3,880,000 total blacks in the South. When we discuss “forcing” men to fight, we must talking not only about forcing slaves to fight, but also about forcing Free Men to fight. Free white men were also “forced” to fight—the South had the first draft in American history—yet we hear nothing about how whites were “forced” to fight for the South. There were more Free Men of Color in the slave states than there were in the free states (U.S. Census, 1860). The author of this article knows many white, brown, and black men who were “forced” to fight in another war– Vietnam, yet their service today is honored and celebrated— no one today dismisses their service because they were “forced to fight.” 2. Union Surgeon Steiner Sees Uniformed Confederate Blacks with Weapons Dr. Lewis Steiner, Union Surgeon, Chief Inspector of the United States Sanitary Commission, observed General Stonewall Jackson’s occupation of Frederick, Maryland, in 1862. He wrote: Over 3,000 Negroes must be included in this number [of 64,000 Confederate troops]. These were clad in all kinds of uniforms, not only in cast-off or captured United States uniforms,…

Union Docs.

Union Documentation of Black Confederates We had been advised not to print the first two historical quotations because they are "too much" – but history is history and the 37th offers history without editorial opinion. It is for the visitor to assess. From Federal Official Records – (Official Records, Series I, Vol XVI Part I, pg. 805: – Lt. Col. Parkhurst’s Report (Ninth Michigan Infantry) on General Forrest’s attack at Murfreesboro, Tenn, July 13, 1862: "The forces attacking my camp were the First Regiment Texas Rangers, Colonel Wharton, and a battalion of the First Georgia Rangers, Colonel Morrison, and a large number of citizens of Rutherford County, many of whom had recently taken the oath of allegiance to the United States Government. There were also quite a number of negroes attached to the Texas and Georgia troops, who were armed and equipped, and took part in the several engagements with my forces during the day." "Indianapolis Daily Evening Gazette" 12 March 1863 refers to the 5 March 1863 fight around Thompson’s Station, near Franklin, TN that ended in a Union fiasco and surrender of troops. The Nashville, Tenn. Union of Saturday [7 March 1863] speaking of the disastrous affair near Franklin, Tenn., on Thursday last [5 March 1863], says: NEGRO REGIMENTS IN THE REBEL ARMY.– Gen. Earl Van Dorn, CSA "During the fight the battery in charge of the 85th Indiana [Volunteer Infantry] was attacked by [*in italics*] two rebel negro regiments. [*end italics*] Our artillerists double-shotted their guns and cut the black regiments to pieces, and brought their battery safely off. * * * * It has been stated, repeatedly, for two weeks past, that a large number, perhaps one-fourth, of Van Dorn’s force were [*in italics*] negro soldiers [*end italics*], and the statement is fully confirmed by this…

Bad History Lesson

History Professor Doesn’t Know His History Confederacy created to perpetrate slavery It was disappointing to see the News-Sentinel devote front-page space in its Sunday perspective section on Feb. 27 to Edward Bardill’s misconceived tribute to black soldiers in the Confederate army. His claim that tens of thousands of free and slave blacks fought for the Confederacy in integrated combat units is pure fiction. Many blacks worked in support roles. But they were not uniformed, were not soldiers, were not paid and were not given a choice: They were slaves commandeered by the Confederate government. As for actual combatants, one can find a few stray cases. In a war that involved this many people, one can find a few stray cases of anything. But, until the desperate last days of the war, it was not Confederate policy to recruit or even permit black soldiers, and the number who served surreptitiously was insignificantly small. Bardill cites two recent books to support his assertions. We have no censors in this country, and people can say and publish anything they want. Plenty of books exist to show that Lyndon Johnson ordered Kennedy’s assassination, that Elvis was abducted by the CIA and that the Holocaust and the moon landing never happened. The question is whether any credible evidence backs up their claims. Sometimes actions reveal motives. If blacks viewed the war as a defense of "their homeland" against "an armed invasion," they would have shunned and hindered the invaders, as many white southerners did. Instead, Union commanders advancing into Confederate territory reported flocks of refugees seeking the shelter of their lines. What does Bardill think these people were fleeing from? Unfortunately, there is more at work here than a case of innocent error. In bringing the 1863 New York City riots into his article, Bardill…

Blacks in War

Black Confederates Fact Page The fact page makes reference to a video entitled "Black Southern Heritage." You can order a copy of this video through DixieRising.Com. CLICK HERE to access their website)   by Scott K. Williams Black Confederates Why haven’t we heard more about them? National Park Service historian, Ed Bearrs, stated, "I don’t want to call it a conspiracy to ignore the role of Blacks both above and below the Mason-Dixon line, but it was definitely a tendency that began around 1910" Historian, Erwin L. Jordan, Jr., calls it a "cover-up" which started back in 1865. He writes, "During my research, I came across instances where Black men stated they were soldiers, but you can plainly see where ‘soldier’ is crossed out and ‘body servant’ inserted, or ‘teamster’ on pension applications." Another black historian, Roland Young, says he is not surprised that blacks fought. He explains that "…some, if not most, Black southerners would support their country" and that by doing so they were "demonstrating it’s possible to hate the system of slavery and love one’s country." This is the very same reaction that most African Americans showed during the American Revolution, where they fought for the colonies, even though the British offered them freedom if they fought for them. It has been estimated that over 65,000 Southern blacks were in the Confederate ranks. Over 13,000 of these, "saw the elephant" also known as meeting the enemy in combat. These Black Confederates included both slave and free. The Confederate Congress did not approve blacks to be officially enlisted as soldiers (except as musicians), until late in the war. But in the ranks it was a different story. Many Confederate officers did not obey the mandates of politicians, they frequently enlisted blacks with the simple criteria, "Will you fight?" Historian…

Black Officer

WILLIAM BUGG, AFRICAN AMERICAN CONFEDERATE STATES NAVAL OFFICER. In 1898, the Naval Records and Library of the US Navy Department issued the publication Register of Officers of the Confederate States Navy, 1861-1865, compiled from US and CS navy registers, reports of officers, records of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, and other miscellaneous papers. This publication includes Pilots who served with the Confederate States Navy and were considered as being Warrant Officers. Amongst the Pilots listed in the register is one William (Billy) Bugg, appointed in the Confederate States Navy from the state of Georgia. He is shown as having served aboard the CSS Isondiga and the CSS Sampson, as well as the Savannah station, between 1863 and 1865. Because of the sparse nature of Confederate records, his pre-war and post war life is unknown. Series 2, Volume 1 of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, includes the names of many Naval officers and enlisted men who served in the Confederate States Navy during the war. On page 289 of this particular volume is included extracts of the muster rolls of the CSS Isondiga for the period January – March, and July – December, 1863, as well as January – September, 1864. William Bugg is shown as one of three Pilots aboard the vessel during that period. From page 498, Volume 16 of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion is extracted the following, additional details about Pilot William Bugg in a despatch dated Augusta, Georgia, January 9, 1865, and sent to Captain S.S. Lee, C.S. Navy by Flag Officer William W. Hunter: I have to report the desertion of G.J. Clark, pilot for the waters adjacent to Savannah, and his…

Sharing History

Black soldier shares battlefield, his history By VICKIE WELBORN PLEASANT HILL, La. Among the sea of blue and gray coats at the recent re-enactment of the 140th anniversary of the Battle of Pleasant Hill was the face of at least one black man. When the Battle of Pleasant Hill was actually fought 140 years ago, there perhaps were many, many more. The role of the black Confederate in the Civil War has been the subject of much debate, but not for Stan Armstrong, a Las Vegas film producer and University at Nevada Las Vegas teacher with strong roots to the historic battle and to Louisiana. Armstrong’s desire to get the word about the little discussed participation of black soldiers in the war – some estimating the numbers as high as 100,000 – coupled with love for the South led Armstrong to research and then produce a documentary, Black Confederates: The Forgotten Men in Gray, which recently won honorable mention at the New York Institute’s Film Festival. It wasn’t hard for Armstrong to trace his connection to the Civil War. His great-great-grandfather, John David Herndon, was a Confederate captain of a Louisiana regiment and fought at the Battle of Mansfield. He also was white. Herndon had a relationship with a black slave mistress, which was not uncommon in that day. The union produced two children, Joseph and Fannie Herndon. Joseph Herndon was black. Herndon Magnet School in Shreveport gets its name from the same Herndon family. Armstrong’s now deceased parents were native Louisianans; his father was from Shreveport and his mother from Rodessa. About 180 acres in Rodessa passed down through the generations from John David Herndon remain in the family’s possession. "I made my first visit to Louisiana in 1994. My mom died in 1995. She loved this land so…

Confederate Veteran Shot

Negro Confederate Veteran Shot Dallas, Tex. – June 14.  Two negroes, Henson Williams and his son William, were shot dead from ambush in Brazos County, while they were plowing in a field.  Officers are searching for a white man who is believed to have shot them.  The elder Williams fought through the Civil War as a Confederate soldier and made such a good record that he was made a full member of the Confederate Veteran’s camp at Milliken.  The old white Confederate soldiers are enraged at the assassination and threaten vengeance on the assassin when captured. New York Times issue dated 6/15/1900.

Memory Articles

Black History Month and Civil War Memory Articles     Bill Vallante’s research on The Slave Narratives present a VERY DIFFERENT look at such topics as slave life, Reconstruction, and the South’s struggle for independence. This is far different than what you read in ‘mainstream’ history texts. The Politically Correct historians of today want you to ignore these vast records. To the Left are  some of Vallante’s articles.